Chem Explorers

The Rare and Valuable Rhenium: Properties Uses and Facts

Rhenium Chemical Properties

Rhenium is a chemical element with the symbol Re and atomic number 75. It belongs to group 7 in the periodic table and is part of the d-block.

Its atomic weight is 186.207 u, with an electronegativity of 1.9. Its atomic density is 21.02 g/cm3. Rheniums melting point is 3186C, and its boiling point is 5630C.

The Vanderwaals radius is 248 ppm, and the ionic radius is 205 pm. Rhenium has 36 isotopes, with 75 Re being the most stable.

Rhenium is considered a transition metal and has seven oxidation states: +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6, and +7. Its CAS number is 7440-15-5, and its ChemSpider ID is 24773030.

Rhenium electron configuration has five electronic shells. The first shell has 2 electrons, the second shell has 8 electrons, the third shell has 18 electrons, the fourth shell has 32 electrons, and the fifth shell has 13 electrons.

The energy of the first ionization is 755.82 kJ/mol, the energy of the second ionization is 1600 kJ/mol, and the energy of the third ionization is 2610 kJ/mol.

Rhenium Uses and Applications

Rhenium is a versatile metal that has a range of uses and applications. Here are some of its most common uses:

Catalyst – Rhenium is a popular catalyst used in many chemical reactions, including refining crude oil into gasoline.

Mass Spectrographs – Rhenium has a unique property of not requiring a filament to emit electrons, making it an ideal material for use in mass spectrographs. Superalloy in Aircraft Applications – Rhenium is an essential component in superalloys used in high-temperature applications, such as aircraft engines and turbine blades.

Alloys – Rhenium is used in combinations with other metals to create alloys that have improved strength, hardness, and durability. Some of these alloys are used in electrical contacts, heating elements, and thermocouples.

Thermistors – Rhenium is used in the manufacture of thermistors, which are temperature sensors used in a range of industrial applications. In conclusion, rhenium is a valuable and versatile element with many uses and applications.

Its chemical properties make it an ideal material for use in a range of industries, from catalysis to aerospace. As technology advances and new applications are discovered, rheniums versatility and usefulness are sure to keep it in high demand.

Rhenium Physical Properties

Rhenium has several physical properties that make it unique and valuable. It is a grey-black in color and has an appearance that is similar to that of tungsten.

Rhenium has the second-highest melting point of any element (after tungsten) at 3186C. At room temperature, rhenium is a solid metal that is highly valued for its strength and flexibility.

Rhenium is one of the rare materials that remain ductile and flexible even at low temperatures, making it ideal for use in high-precision and high-performance applications. One of the most interesting physical properties of rhenium is its paramagnetic nature.

Paramagnetism is a type of magnetism that occurs when a material has unpaired electrons. Because rhenium has an odd number of electrons (75), it has at least one unpaired electron per atom, which makes it paramagnetic.

This means that rhenium is weakly attracted to a magnetic field and has a magnetic susceptibility that is greater than zero.

Rhenium Facts

Discovery – Rhenium was discovered in 1925 by Walter Noddack, Ida Tacke, and Otto Berg. They found it by analyzing the mineral columbite, which contains tantalum and niobium.

Naming – Rhenium is named after the Rhine River in Europe. Production – Rhenium is produced as a byproduct of copper or molybdenum mining.

It is also obtained by processing spent catalysts containing rhenium. Price – Due to its rarity and high production costs, rhenium is one of the most expensive metals in the world.

As of 2021, the price of rhenium is approximately $4,000 per kilogram. Rarity – Rhenium is one of the rarest stable elements in the Earth’s crust, with an average abundance of just 1 part per billion.

It is estimated that only 40-50 tons of rhenium are produced each year. Toxicity – Rhenium is not toxic to humans or animals and is not considered to be a health hazard.

History – Rhenium has a rich history dating back to the early 20th century when it was first discovered. It was initially believed to be a rare earth element, but later tests proved that it was a transition metal.

Over the years, rhenium has become increasingly important in many industrial applications, from aviation to medicine. Despite its rarity and high cost, rhenium has become an indispensable and essential material in modern industry.

It has a wide range of applications, from the production of alloys and catalysts to its use in high-precision instruments and medical equipment. As technology advances and new uses are discovered, rhenium’s versatility and uniqueness are sure to make it a valuable material for many years to come.

Rhenium is a highly valuable and versatile chemical element with unique physical and chemical properties. It has a range of applications, from aviation and automobile manufacturing to chemical and medical industries.

Despite being one of the rarest stable elements, its importance and versatility make it an essential material for many industries, with a wide range of applications. Rhenium’s rarity and high production cost contribute to it being one of the most expensive metals in the world.

As technology advances, it is sure to find new and innovative applications in the future. FAQs:

Q: What is rhenium used for?

A: Rhenium has many uses, including as a catalyst, in mass spectrographs, in superalloys for aircraft applications, in thermistors, and in the production of alloys. Q: Is rhenium toxic?

A: Rhenium is not toxic to humans or animals and is not considered to be a health hazard. Q: How was rhenium discovered?

A: Rhenium was discovered in 1925 by Walter Noddack, Ida Tacke, and Otto Berg. Q: Why is rhenium so expensive?

A: Rhenium is one of the rarest stable elements in the Earth’s crust with an average abundance of just 1 part per billion, and its production cost is quite high. Q: What is the melting point of rhenium?

A: Rhenium has the second-highest melting point of any element (after tungsten) at 3186C. Q: What is the atomic number of rhenium?

A: Rhenium has an atomic number of 75. Q: Is rhenium a magnetic material?

A: Rhenium is paramagnetic, meaning it is weakly attracted to a magnetic field due to its nature of having unpaired electrons. Q: What is the CAS number of rhenium?

A: Rhenium has a CAS number of 7440-15-5.

Popular Posts