Chem Explorers

Uncovering the Rare and Highly Reactive Element: Fermium

Fermium is a highly reactive, synthetic element that was first produced in the late 1950s. It belongs to the actinide series in the periodic table, and it has an atomic number of 100.

This article will explore the properties of Fermium and provide an insightful overview of the chemical element.

Fermium Symbol

The symbol of Fermium is Fm. It is one of the rarest elements in the periodic table, and it is not found naturally on Earth. This element can only be produced through the synthesis of other elements.

Fermium Group in Periodic Table

Fermium is a member of the actinide series, which is a group of elements that occupy the seventh row of the periodic table. These elements are characterized by their high atomic numbers, and they share a similar electronic configuration.

The actinide series is located at the bottom of the periodic table, below the lanthanide series.

Fermium Period in Periodic Table

Fermium is an element in period 7 of the periodic table. It is part of the f block of elements, which is located on the bottom of the periodic table.

This region of the table is also known as the inner transition metals.

Fermium Block in Periodic Table

Fermium is an f block element, which means that its valence electrons occupy the f orbital. It is also classified as a single atom since it has a single atom of Fermium.

Fermium Atomic Number

The atomic number of Fermium is 100. This means that there are 100 protons in the nucleus of the Fermium atom.

As an element progresses in the periodic table, its atomic number increases by one.

Fermium Atomic Weight

The atomic weight of Fermium is 257. This is a relative term that is used to describe the mass of an atom of Fermium compared to the mass of a carbon-12 atom.

The atomic weight of Fermium indicates that it is one of the heaviest elements in existence.

Fermium Electronegativity according to Pauling

The electronegativity of Fermium is not well-established due to its scarcity and synthetic nature. Electronegativity refers to the attraction of an atom for electrons in a chemical bond.

Pauling scale is used to measure electronegativity, and it is based on the concept of valency.

Fermium Atomic Density

The atomic density of Fermium is 18.1 g/cm3 at standard temperature and pressure (STP). This is due to its high atomic weight and small atomic radius.

Fermium Melting Point

The melting point of Fermium is not accurately determined. Chemists believe that it can be around 1800C due to its highly reactive nature.

Fermium Boiling Point

The boiling point of Fermium is not accurately determined, but it is believed to be around 1500C due to its highly reactive nature.

Fermium Van der Waals Radius

The Van der Waals radius of Fermium is 260 pm, which is one of the largest of the actinides. Fermium Ionic/Covalent Radius

There is currently no evidence available to suggest a covalent radius for Fermium.

Fermium Isotopes

Fermium has a total of 19 isotopes, ranging from Fm-241 to Fm-259, as determined from proton collisions with the target element. Fm-257 is the most stable isotope, with a half-life of 100.5 days.

Fermium Electronic Shell

The electronic shell of Fermium follows the same pathway as other elements in the actinide series. It has seven valence electrons that occupy the f-orbital.

Fermium Energy of First Ionisation

The energy of the first ionization of Fermium is not well-defined due to its synthetic nature.

Fermium Oxidation States

Fermium has a variety of oxidation states, with the most common being +2 and +3. The oxidation state of an element refers to the number of electrons it has gained or lost in a chemical reaction.

Fermium Electron Configurations

Fermium’s electron configuration follows the Aufbau principle, which dictates the order in which electrons occupy the orbitals of an atom. Its noble gas configuration is [Rn]5f127s2.

Fermium CAS Number

The CAS number for Fermium is 7440-72-4.

Fermium ChemSpider ID

The ChemSpider ID for Fermium is 19514647.

Fermium Allotropic Forms

There is currently no evidence that suggests Fermium has any allotropic forms.

Fermium Chemical Classification

Fermium is considered a synthetic element, which means that it is not naturally occurring on Earth. It is classified as a metal, and it has a silvery-white appearance.

Fermium State at Room Temperature

At room temperature, Fermium is solid. However, due to its highly reactive nature, its properties are not fully established.

Fermium Paramagnetic

Fermium is paramagnetic, which means that it has unpaired electrons in its outer shell. This effect is exhibited in its magnetic properties.

In conclusion, Fermium is one of the rarest elements in the periodic table, and it is not found naturally on Earth. It belongs to the actinide series, has an atomic number of 100, and a large atomic weight and density.

Despite its synthetic nature and limited availability, scientists continue to research the properties of Fermium to gain a better understanding of its unique characteristics. In summary, Fermium is a synthetic element that belongs to the actinide series in the periodic table.

It has an atomic number of 100, a large atomic weight and density, and is highly reactive. While its properties are still being researched and fully established, Fermium’s unique characteristics make it an essential topic of study for chemists and physicists.

FAQs for readers: What is Fermium used for? Fermium doesn’t have any practical uses yet since it is rare and expensive.

What is Fermium’s origin? Fermium was first synthesized by nuclear bombardment in 1952.

Is Fermium radioactive? Yes, Fermium is highly radioactive, and most of its isotopes have short half-lives of minutes or seconds.

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