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Unlocking the Mystery of Tennessine: Exploring the Newest Element on the Periodic Table

Tennessine: Discovering the Mysterious Element

When it comes to scientific discoveries, few are as exciting as the identification of a new element on the periodic table. In 2016, that’s precisely what happened when Tennessine (Ts) was officially recognized as element 117.

This exciting development has scientists around the world buzzing with interest, and for good reason. In this article, we will examine the chemical properties, identification, discovery, history, properties and characteristics, and where to find Tennessine.

Chemical Properties of Tennessine

Although Tennessine only exists for brief moments in a laboratory setting, scientists have been able to identify its unique chemical properties. The element has six oxidation states, ranging from -1 to +5, which makes it highly reactive.

Additionally, Tennessine is very unstable and decays almost instantaneously. As a result, it is classified as a highly synthetic element.

Identification of Tennessine

The identification process for Tennessine was a collaboration between several scientific institutions and researchers. The IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) first discovered the element in JINR (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

The identification process was confirmed when scientists were able to produce four atoms of Tennessine in a collision between Berkelium-249 and Calcium-48.

Discovery of Tennessine

The discovery of Tennessine was a significant event in the world of science, but it was not easy. The research required the use of advanced technology, including particle accelerators and high-powered lasers, to make the identification possible.

Despite the challenges, the discovery was made, opening up new opportunities for further research into this intriguing element.

History of Tennessine

The name Tennessine is derived from the state of Tennessee, where one of the collaborating institutions, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is located. The state has played a crucial role in the discovery and exploration of nuclear power and the element shares its name with the region.

Tennessine also has its own symbol, Ts, which is in line with other elements on the periodic table.

Properties and Characteristics of Tennessine

Tennessine belongs to the Halogen family and has an atomic mass of 294. Like most synthetic elements, it is a silvery-grey color and exists in a gaseous state.

Tennessine’s melting point is 623 Kelvin (350 Celsius), and its boiling point is estimated to be around 883 Kelvin (610 Celsius). The density of the element is 7.2 grams per cubic centimeter, making it denser than most other elements.

As far as thermal conductivity goes, Tennessine is a poor conductor, similar to most elements in its group. Where is Tennessine Found?

Unlike other elements that have natural occurrences, all Tennessine is created in laboratories in incredibly small amounts. The creation of this element can only occur under strict laboratory conditions, and due to its instability and short half-life, Tennessine cannot be used for any practical purposes.

It is purely for scientific study. In conclusion, the discovery of Tennessine was a testament to the fascinating world of science.

Although its lifetime is short-lived and is only produced in tiny quantities, this element has caused ripples throughout the scientific community. It is not often that a new element is added to the periodic table, so the opportunity to study it could have long term impacts on our understanding of the world and beyond.

Tennessine: A Brief History and Discovery

The discovery of a new element is a thrilling prospect for scientists and the world. Tennessine (Ts), element 117, is one such element.

Named after the state of Tennessee in the United States, Tennessine has a fascinating history and a complex discovery story, making it a unique element in the periodic table.

Origin of its Name

The state of Tennessee played a significant role in the discovery and the naming of Tennessine. It was named after the state to honor the contributions of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is located in Tennessee, and its role in the discovery of several elements.

Before it received its name, placeholders such as Ununseptium and Eka-Astatine were used to describe the element. Tennessine’s Discovery

The discovery of Tennessine was a collaborative effort between several scientific institutions, including the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).

Scientists at these institutions worked together to identify and confirm the existence of this element.

The Discovery Procedure

The process to discover Tennessine started with the creation of a rare and radioactive isotope, Berkelium-249 (Bk249). The scientists at ORNL and LLNL used the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron to bombard Calcium-48 (Ca48) with high-energy ions, producing four atoms of Tennessine.

These four atoms of Tennessine were identified by their unique decay chains, affirming the success of the experiment.

IUPAC Confirmation

After the identification of the four Tennessine atoms, the next step was for the IUPAC to confirm that they had indeed discovered a new element. IUPAC independently verified the findings of the scientific institutions in 2016, announcing the discovery of Tennessine.

The

Discovery of Tennessine in Context

The discovery of Tennessine highlights how science works best when institutions work together and share their expertise. The discovery of Tennessine was the first since 2010 when element 114, Flerovium, was discovered.

The approach used to identify Tennessine was not unlike previous approaches. Scientists have traditionally utilized particle accelerators to bombard atoms with ions, but the complexity of the discovery came from the difficulty of identifying the decay chains of the produced atoms.

In conclusion, the history and discovery of Tennessine are fascinating, and the collaboration between different scientific institutions and expertise demonstrates how science progresses in a cooperative effort. The discovery took place under controlled laboratory conditions, and while the element has no practical uses, it will help scientists expand our understanding of the building blocks of our universe and advanced technology.

We hope that this fascinating element will continue to conduct research, and its discovery be celebrated as a significant milestone in our scientific history. Tennessine: Identification and Properties

Tennessine, also known as element 117, is one of the newest elements to be added to the periodic table.

The element has a short half-life and only exists for brief moments in a laboratory setting. Despite its fleeting existence, scientists have been able to identify its characteristics and properties, which have contributed to the advancement of our understanding of the universe.

Tennessine Identification

Tennessine has an atomic number of 117, which places it in the row below Flerovium and the row above Oganesson on the periodic table. Its CAS number is 87658-56-8.

As a group 17 halogen, Tennessine is located in the p block of the periodic table with all the other halogens. The element shares similar properties with its Halogen family counterparts, including fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine.

Properties of Tennessine

General Properties

Tennessine has an atomic mass of 294. Its atomic weight is estimated to be around 294 g/mol due to being a highly synthetic element.

Tennessine is a highly reactive element because of its six oxidation states, ranging from -1 to +5. Its large electron affinity explains its high reactivity as it tries to gain an electron to complete the valence electron configuration.

Physical Properties

In terms of physical properties, Tennessine is a silvery-grey color and exists in a gaseous state. The melting point of Tennessine is reported to be around 623 Kelvin (350 Celsius), and its boiling point is estimated to be around 883 Kelvin (610 Celsius).

At room temperature and pressure, Tennessine is typically in a gas state. Tennessine has a density of 7.2 grams per cubic centimeter, which is denser than many other elements.

Its density is higher than that of iodine, bromine, and chlorine, but less than that of fluorine. It is a poor conductor of electricity, and its thermal conductivity is similar to other halogens, which is relatively low.

Chemical Properties

Tennessine is highly reactive, and its reactivity increases as it goes up the oxidation state to +5. It has a strong affinity for other elements and is unstable, with an average lifespan of just 0.000052 seconds.

When it reacts, it can form a variety of chemical compounds, including Tennessine trihalides (TsX3), Tennessine tetrachlorides (TsCl4), and Tennessine dyhalides (TsX2). The most common oxidation states for Tennessine are +1, +3, and +5.

The fact that Tennessine has six possible oxidation states indicates that it is a versatile and reactive element. It can bond with many different elements, including metals, nonmetals, and metalloids.

In conclusion, Tennessine is a fascinating element with unique characteristics and properties. The discovery of this element and the subsequent identification of its properties has contributed to the expansion of our knowledge of atomic theory.

Although we may not have practical uses for it, the knowledge gained from Tennessine will undoubtedly contribute to future developments in technology and science.

Atomic Data of Tennessine (Element 117) and Uses

The discovery of Tennessine (Ts) in 2010 marked another milestone in the world of science as it increased the number of elements identified on the periodic table. This element has unique atomic data, which has contributed to researchers’ better understanding of human behaviors, advanced technology development, and many more.

In this article, we will delve into the atomic data of Tennessine as well as its usage.

Atomic Data of Tennessine

Valence Electrons

The electron configuration of Tennessine is [Rn]5f^14 6d^10 7s^2 7p^5, indicating that it has a total of seven valence electrons. The noble gas configuration of Tennessine is radon and adding Tennessine to form a covalent bond leads to a strong bond as it reaches the noble gas configuration.

Atomic Structure

Tennessine contains 117 electrons, 117 protons, and 177 neutrons in its nucleus. It is a highly synthetic element, and it remains sporadically produced in particle accelerators.

Tennessine belongs to the Halogen family, and it is located in the p-block with its family members fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Tennessine has seven total energy levels, starting with two electrons in the 7s orbital and leading up to five electrons in the 7p orbital.

Radius of the Atom

The atomic radius of Tennessine is not well defined as it is a highly synthetic element with minimal experimentally observed data. However, it is estimated to have a covalent radius of 135 picometers (pm).

This is larger than iodine’s covalent radius, which is the closest element on the periodic table.

Electronegativity

As an element, Tennessine has an electronegativity that is difficult to determine due to the lack of evidence.

Electronegativity generally refers to an element’s ability to attract electrons to itself when it forms a bond.

Ionization Energy

Tennessine has an estimated 1st ionization energy of 876 kilojoules per mole. Its 2nd ionization energy is predicted to be even higher at around 1673 kilojoules per mole.

The element’s 3rd ionization energy is expected to be 2972 kilojoules per mole. It is worth mentioning that these are estimates obtained from reliable sources and further research is required for perfect accuracy.

Tennessine Uses

Tennessine is a highly synthetic element, and its existence has fundamental implications for research purposes. The method used to synthesize Tennessine can also lead to creating a basis for developing future elements and understanding the atom’s structure.

Its short lifetime provides a benchmark for atomic decay chain studies. As a result, many researchers are focusing on studying its characteristics and properties, which will contribute significantly to our understanding of the structure of matter and atomic theory.

To date, there are no known restrictions on the use of Tennessine for research purposes. In conclusion, Tennessine’s unique atomic data has contributed to the advancement of our understanding of atomic theory, matter’s structure, and future element synthesis.

Although the element has no practical uses, Tennessine’s discovery marks a significant milestone in scientific research. The characteristics and properties of this element prove challenging due to its highly synthetic nature, but these difficulties have led to more comprehensive research practices that will undoubtedly grow our understanding of all atoms’ characteristics.

Is Tennessine Dangerous? Interesting Facts about Element 117

Tennessine (Ts), the 117th element on the periodic table, has captured the curiosity of scientists and the general public alike.

As a highly synthetic element, Tennessine is known for its fleeting existence and unique properties. In this article, we will explore whether Tennessine is dangerous, as well as some interesting facts surrounding its discovery and characteristics.

Radioactivity of Tennessine

As a synthetic element with a short half-life, Tennessine is considered highly radioactive. Its most stable isotope, Tennessine-294, has a half-life of approximately 0.000052 seconds.

This means that any significant amount of Tennessine would rapidly decay into other elements. The high radioactivity of Tennessine presents challenges when handling and studying the element, requiring specialized facilities and precautions to ensure safety.

Harmful Effects of Tennessine

Due to the highly radioactive nature and short lifespan of Tennessine, there is a concern about its potentially harmful effects. In general, exposure to any radioactive substance is hazardous to human health.

The decay of Tennessine atoms releases radiation, which can damage living cells and genetic material. However, the fleeting existence and minuscule quantities in which Tennessine is produced make significant exposure extremely unlikely.

Interesting Facts about Tennessine

Naming and Placeholders

The naming of elements is governed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC). Prior to its official name, Tennessine had two placeholder names: Ununseptium (Uus) and Eka-Astatine.

These names were used to identify the yet unnamed element 117. The decision to name Tennessine arose from its discovery at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, making it the first element to be named after a location in the United States.

Tennessine and the “Super Heavy” Period

Tennessine belongs to the “super heavy” elements, also known as the transactinide elements. These elements are characterized by their high atomic numbers and are primarily created synthetically in laboratories.

Alongside Tennessine, other elements in this group include Oganesson (118), Moscovium (115), and Nihonium (113). The discovery of these elements has expanded our knowledge of the periodic table and contributed to advancements in nuclear physics and chemistry.

Cost of Tennessine

Determining the exact cost of Tennessine is difficult due to its highly synthetic nature and the limited production methods. Generally, creating synthetic elements requires significant resources, including advanced scientific equipment and skilled personnel.

The cost of producing and studying Tennessine would likely be substantial, but specific figures are not readily available. In conclusion, Tennessine’s highly synthetic nature, short half-life, and radioactivity make it potentially hazardous to human health.

However, the limited production and minuscule quantities in which Tennessine is generated diminish the possibility of significant exposure. It remains a valuable element for scientific research, contributing to our understanding of atomic theory and the structure of matter.

The naming of Tennessine after the state of Tennessee and its association with the “super heavy” elements add intrigue and excitement to its discovery. As further research advances, more insights about Tennessine’s properties, potential uses, and even the cost associated with its production may come to light.

In conclusion, Tennessine (Ts) is a highly synthetic and radioactive element with a short half-life. While it poses potential risks due to its radioactivity, the fleeting existence and minimal quantities produced reduce the likelihood of significant exposure.

The naming of Tennessine after the state of Tennessee adds an intriguing aspect to its discovery, and its placement in the “super heavy” period of the periodic table highlights its significance in advancing scientific knowledge. The unique characteristics and properties of Tennessine contribute to our understanding of atomic theory and the structure of matter.

Although its practical applications are limited, the research conducted on Tennessine provides valuable insights for future scientific endeavors.

FAQs:

1.

Is Tennessine dangerous? Tennessine is highly synthetic and radioactive, posing risks due to its radioactivity.

However, its short half-life and minimal production quantities mitigate the likelihood of significant exposure. 2.

What is Tennessine’s atomic number? Tennessine is the 117th element on the periodic table.

3. How is Tennessine identified?

Tennessine is identified by its atomic number (117), CAS number (87658-56-8), and its position in the periodic table, specifically in the p-block with other halogens. 4.

Can Tennessine be used for practical purposes? Currently, Tennessine has no known practical uses.

Its significance lies in expanding our understanding of atomic theory through research and experimentation. 5.

How was Tennessine discovered? Tennessine was discovered in a collaborative effort between scientific institutions, including JINR, LLNL, ORNL, and IUPAC.

It was produced by bombarding Berkelium-249 with Calcium-48. 6.

What are the general properties of Tennessine? Tennessine has an atomic mass of 294 and is a highly reactive element with six oxidation states.

It exists in a gaseous state, has a silvery-grey color, and exhibits properties typical of other halogens. 7.

How much does Tennessine cost? The exact cost of Tennessine is unknown due to its highly synthetic nature and limited production.

However, creating synthetic elements requires substantial resources and expertise. 8.

What is the significance of Tennessine’s naming? Tennessine is the first element to be named after a location in the United States, honoring the contributions of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory located in Tennessee.

9. Can Tennessine be found naturally?

No, Tennessine is a highly synthetic element and cannot be found naturally. It is only produced in laboratories under controlled conditions.

10. What are the potential uses of Tennessine?

Currently, Tennessine is primarily used for research purposes, contributing to our understanding of atomic theory and the structure of matter.

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